Wednesday, January 30, 2019

evening star, top completed

Maybe I should rename this morning star.
I got up at 5 o'clock this morning to see the crescent moon with Venus and Jupiter. 
The air was so clear and it was -21 degrees when I stepped outside.
Here in the city we don't see many stars so I like to take advantage of the planets.

I did some work (we have an inclement weather day so campuses are closed) then finished putting together this top. It is with more lighter fabrics than what I have been working with lately and shows and feels lighter in reality--a winter quilt!

Block finishes 12"
Set 7 by 8 blocks
Top measures 84 by 96

Solids cut from 2 1/2 inch strips
Prints cut from 4 1/2 inch strips

My design, use at your pleasure.

Monday, January 21, 2019

at the dorm

After a semester abroad, Seth is back on campus. It is fun to see which quilt they choose to take to the dorm
This one was made for Seth's 7th birthday.

Be a good roommate, Seth.

Sunday, January 20, 2019

dog!

This sweet dog is in our lives.

Saturday, January 19, 2019

ladder

Ladder
Finishes 4 by 12 inches
A simple block

I will sew these into 4 block units of 12 by 16 inches finished.
4 block unit
I plan to set 7 by 24, (7 by 6 units)
168 blocks (42 units)
84 by 96 inches

Cutting:
Solid: four 1 1/2 by 4 1/2 inches cut
Print: four 2 1/2 by 4 1/2 inches cut

Pressing:
All pieces to the side that ends with the print rectangle.
Every other block will be flipped so the seams will nest.

Units will be pieced into columns, so all up or all down every other column, all units will nest.

My design. Use at your pleasure.

Friday, January 18, 2019

basket

Basket
Finishes 8 inches
A complicated block
Mainly in the pressing. I'll include my pressing plan at the end of this post.
Fabric choices easiest with non-directional unless you don't worry about such.
I will save most of my directional fabrics for the setting triangles.

The block is scaled up from the AQSblog 2017 Christmas Countdown. I also changed the body of the basket to a single piece.
Block finishes 8 inches (about 12 inches on point).
I don't know how big I will go with this quilt. I'll post about the setting pieces when I decide that. (This may be months away from now.)

Cutting:
Solid:
-four half square triangles cut from 2 1/2 inch strip with Easy Angle or Bonnie Hunter's triangle tool
-two shapes (some call it a chisel shape)  cut from 2 1/2 inch strips using a tool cut so they are finishing 4 inches; from the equivalent of a 4 1/2 inch piece. It will measure 4 1/2 inches from the blunted point along the long edge.
I will demonstrate below.
(If you don't want to cut the chisel shape, replace each with one square and one triangle.)

Print:
-three 2 1/2 inch squares
-four half square triangles cut from 2 1/2 inch strip with a tool
-one half square triangle from 4 1/2 inch strip; or from the corner of the yardage.
I will demonstrate below.
cutting chisel shape using Easy Angle
blunt point
cutting the bottom triangle from yardage corner

Pressing:
Chisel shape: press solid to the print.
Press chisel units to the print rectangles
Top triangles: press to the solid, then press to the print squares.
Press to the center so the print triangles of this unit and the chisel unit nest.
Base: press triangles to the square, press base to the print.
Quarter blocks: press towards the chisel units
Half block: along the equator, press half of your blocks north and half of them south so all blocks will nest.

Friday, January 11, 2019

batik

For Christmas my friend Sharon gave me three fat quarters of lovely Turtle Hand Batik. It has a different feel and look from most batiks on the market.
I have used it all up! It will show up in several quilts in progress.
There were a few scraps remaining to cut down for my squares bin, so there will be little jewels to come upon in the future.
These stars finish 12 inches.

Saturday, January 05, 2019

tip #45, cut reverse side of fabric

I usually cut on the right side of the fabric so I can enjoy it while I work with it.
There are times though, to flip the fabric to the reverse for cutting.
It is easier to see green and purple fabrics when they are lighter as they are on the reverse. Also, when cutting down uneven edged garment making scraps, the grain lines are more evident on the reverse.